Services for Adolescents

We Promote Growth and Change in Individuals

Anger Management Issues


Does your child have angry outbursts that are out of proportion to whatever is said or done? 


We will help him/her learn to express anger through appropriate verbalizations, on a consistent basis; reduce frequency of temper outbursts; and, learn to interact with others in a mutually respectful manner.


Anxiety


Is your child frequently worried or afraid; restless, tired, shaky; constantly on edge and irritable? Does he/she seem to be experiencing panic attacks? 


We will him/her learn to implement calming skills to reduce symptoms of anxiety; identify, challenge and replace fearful self-talk with positive, realistic, and empowering self-talk; learn and implement strategies for realistically addressing fears or worries; help parents learn and implement constructive ways to respond to their child’s fear and avoidance; verbalize and increased understanding of anxious feelings and their causes; identify and use specific coping strategies for anxiety reduction; and, participate in family therapy sessions that identify and resolve conflicts between family members and increase the family’s level of healthy functioning.


Depression


Is your child sad, irritable, isolating hisself/herself from family and friends; stopped enjoying activities he/she used to enjoy; have less of an appetite than usual; seem to have an increased need for sleep; have difficulty concentrating; or, expressing that he/she feels hopeless or worthless? 


We will help him/her identify the source of the depressed mood; identify and replace depressive thinking that leads to depression; help him/her learn and implement a routine of physical exercise; learn problem-solving and conflict resolution skills; learn to express their emotional needs to others; and, learn to eat nutritional meals regularly and adjust sleep so that they get restful sleep.


Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)


Has your child been exposed to threats of death or serious injury or been subjected to actual injury that has resulted in him/her feeling fearful or helpless; been exposed to domestic violence; been removed from the home; been sexually abused, physically abused, emotionally abused, or neglected; are they having dreams, flashbacks, stressful reminders of a traumatic event; avoiding thoughts, feelings, people, places, or conversations about a traumatic event; expressing a sense of detachment from others; have difficulty expressing a full range of emotions, including love; have a pessimistic, fatalistic attitude about the future; and are often irritable and angry? 


We will help you and your child understand treatment for PTSD; learn and implement calming and coping strategies to manage emotional reactions related to trauma; learn to express facts and feelings surrounding the trauma; and, learn relaxation techniques.

The young teen years, ages 12-14, are a time of many physical, mental, emotional, and social changes. Boys grow facial and pubic hair and their voices deepen. Most girls grow pubic hair and breasts and start their menstrual cycle. They may start worrying about these changes and how others are looking at them and thinking about them. They may also start to experience peer pressure to use alcohol, smoke cigarettes, use drugs, and have sex. They may also face additional challenges such as depression, family problems, and eating disorders. At this age, teens make more of their own choices about friends, school, extracurricular activities, etc. They start showing concern about their bodies, their looks, and clothes; they go back and forth between feeling very good about themselves and showing a lack of confidence; experience more moodiness; are influenced by their peer group; may be rude and short-tempered with their parents; stressed by more challenging school work; feel depressed which could lead to poor grades, alcohol or drug use, unsafe sex and other problems; they are better able to express their thoughts and feelings through talking; and, should have a stronger sense of right and wrong.


The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends the following Parenting Tips during the middle childhood years, 12 -14 years old:

Be honest and direct with your teen when talking about sensitive subjects such as drugs, drinking, smoking, and sex.

Meet and get to know your teen’s friends.

Show an interest in your teen’s school life.

• Help your teen make healthy choices while encouraging him to make his own decisions.

Respect your teen’s opinions and take into account her thoughts and feelings. It is important that she knows you are listening to her.

• When there is a conflict, be clear about goals and expectations (like getting good grades, keeping things clean, and showing respect), but allow your teen input on how to reach those goals (like when and how to study or clean).


Safety First


You play an important role in keeping your child safe―no matter how old he or she is. Here are a few tips to help protect your child:

Make sure your teen knows about the importance of wearing seatbelts. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among 12- to 14-year-olds.

Encourage your teen to wear a helmet when riding a bike or a skateboard or using inline skates; riding on a motorcycle, snowmobile, or all-terrain vehicle; or playing contact sports. Injuries from sports and other activities are common.

Talk with your teen about the dangers of drugs, drinking, smoking, and risky sexual activity. Ask him what he knows and thinks about these issues and share your thoughts and feelings with him. Listen to what she says and answer her questions honestly and directly.

Talk with your teen about the importance of having friends who are interested in positive activities. Encourage her to avoid peers who pressure her to make unhealthy choices.

Know where your teen is and whether an adult is present. Make plans with him for when he will call you, where you can find him, and what time you expect him home.

• Set clear rules for your teen when she is home alone. Talk about such issues as having friends at the house, how to handle situations that can be dangerous (emergencies, fire, drugs, sex, etc.), and completing homework or household tasks.


Healthy Bodies


• Encourage your teen to be physically active. She might join a team sport or take up an individual sport. Helping with household tasks such as mowing the lawn, walking the dog, or washing the car also will keep your teen active.

Meal-time is very important for families. Eating together helps teens make better choices about the foods they eat, promotes healthy weight, and gives your family members time to talk with each other.

Keep television sets out of your teen’s bedroom. Set limits for screen time, including cell phones, computers, video games, and other devices, and develop a family media plan.

• Make sure your child gets the recommended amount of sleep each night: For teenagers 13-18 years, 8–10 hours per 24 hours (including naps).



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Teenagers! Parents, you’ve been waiting for these years😊.


When teenagers are between the ages of 15-17, they change how they think, feels, and interact with others. They are developing their own unique personalities and opinions. Most girls will have completed puberty by now. Boys may still be maturing physically. Teens may have concerns about their body size, shape, or weight. Relationships with friends are important, however, your teen should have other interests as he/she develops a clearer sense of who they are. Many teens this age, start working and many will be leaving home soon after high school. At this age, teens start having more interest in romantic relationships and sexuality; they have less conflict with their parents; spend less time with parents and more time with friends; can feel depressed with may lead to poor grades, alcohol or drug use, unsafe sex, and other problems. Teens this age may learn more defined work habits; show concern about future school plans/work plans; and are better able to give reasons for their choices, including what is right or wrong.



The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends the following Parenting Tips during the middle childhood years, 15-17 years old:

Talk with your teen about her concerns and pay attention to any changes in her behavior. Ask her if she has had suicidal thoughts, particularly if she seems sad or depressed. Asking about suicidal thoughts will not cause her to have these thoughts, but it will let her know that you care about how she feels. Seek professional help if necessary.

• Show interest in your teen’s school and extracurricular interests and activities and encourage him to become involved in activities such as sports, music, theater, and art.

• Encourage your teen to volunteer and become involved in civic activities in her community.

Compliment your teen and celebrate his efforts and accomplishments.

Show affection for your teen. Spend time together doing things you enjoy.

• Respect your teen’s opinion. Listen to her without playing down her concerns.

• Encourage your teen to develop solutions to problems or conflicts. Help your teenager learn to make good decisions. Create opportunities for him to use his own judgment and be available for advice and support.

If your teen engages in interactive internet media such as games, chat rooms, and instant messaging, encourage her to make good decisions about what she posts and the amount of time she spends on these activities.

• If your teen works, use the opportunity to talk about expectations, responsibilities, and other ways of behaving respectfully in a public setting.

Talk with your teen and help him plan for difficult or uncomfortable situations. Discuss what he can do if he is in a group and someone is using drugs or under pressure to have sex or is offered a ride by someone who has been drinking.

• Respect your teen’s need for privacy.

Encourage your teen to get enough sleep and exercise, and to eat healthy, balanced meals.



Safety First


You play an important role in keeping your child safe―no matter how old he or she is. Here are a few ways to help protect your child:

Talk with your teen about the dangers of driving and how to be safe on the road. You can steer your teen in the right direction. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death from unintentional injury among teens, yet few teens take measures to reduce their risk of injury.

Remind your teen to wear a helmet when riding a bike, motorcycle, or all-terrain vehicle. Unintentional injuries resulting from participation in sports and other activities are common.

Talk with your teen about suicide and pay attention to warning signs. Suicide is the third leading cause of death among youth 15 through 24 years of age.

Talk with your teen about the dangers of drugs, drinking, smoking, and risky sexual activity. Ask him what he knows and thinks about these issues and share your feelings with him. Listen to what he says and answer his questions honestly and directly.

• Discuss with your teen the importance of choosing friends who do not act in dangerous or unhealthy ways.

• Know where your teen is and whether a responsible adult is present. Make plans with her for when she will call you, where you can find her, and what time you expect her home.


Healthy Bodies


• Encourage your teen to get enough sleep and physical activity, and to eat healthy, balanced meals. Make sure your teen gets 1 hour or more of physical activity each day.

Keep television sets out of your teen’s bedroom. Set limits for screen time, including cell phones, computers, video games, and other devices and develop a family media plan.

Encourage your teen to have meals with the family. Eating together will help your teen make better choices about the foods she eats, promote healthy weight, and give family members time to talk with each other. In addition, a teen who eats meals with the family is more likely to get better grades and less likely to smoke, drink, or use drugs, and also less likely to get into fights, think about suicide, or engage in sexual activity.

• Make sure your child gets the recommended amount of sleep each night: For teenagers 13-18 years, 8–10 hours per 24 hours (including naps).

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